Artisan Connect

Baseline value chain survey handicraft producers

Date : 2011-05-30 10:40:01

Description TABLE OF CONTENT | |ACKNOWLEDGEMENT...................................................|3 | | |..................... | | |PART I - |4 | |METHODOLOGY...........................................................| | |............... | | |PART II - RESULTS ANALYSIS OF HANDICRAFT |8 | |PRODUCERS...................... | | |A |SOCIAL |8 | | |INDEX.............................................................| | | |..................... | | |B | ECONOMIC |9 | | |INDEX.............................................................| | | |............. | | |C |COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT |17 | | |INDEX................................................... | | |D | HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION |21 | | |INDEX.................................................... | | |PART III - RESULTS ANALYSIS OF |33 | |SMEs..................................................... | | |A |GENERAL |33 | | |INFORMATION.......................................................| | | |........... | | |B |INFRASTRUCTURE....................................................|34 | | |......................... | | |C |PRODUCTION |36 | | |ACTIVITIES........................................................| | | |........... | | |D | BUSINESS SERVICE AND |48 | | |FINANCE...................................................... | | |PART IV - LESSON |54 | |LEARNTS...............................................................| | |..... | | | |LIST OF |57 | | |TABLE.............................................................| | | |..................... | | ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This Baseline survey is made possible by funding from the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and International Labour Organization (ILO) with the purpose of studying the current situation and capability of handicraft production and trade, acting as input for in-depth study and work-plan. The baseline survey focuses on productivity, environment and labour aspects of craft production in order to establish the baseline situation and monitor improvements over a three years' duration of the Joint Project. We are especially grateful to the Mr. Rene Van Berkel for his kindness and intellectual guidance, our great thanks to UNIDO and ILO team for their very kind support and professional help. For their generosity and great support in the field research, we are deeply indebted to the Programme Management Unit (PMU), Local Authority, Project Management Board in the four provinces, and the People's Committee of the commune levels in four designated provinces: Nghe An, Thanh Hoa, Hoa Binh, Phu Tho Our warmest thanks to great numbers of companies, co-operatives, production groups, households, and local people in the studied site, all of whom have contributed an essential part of the information supply for this baseline survey. HRPC Study Team PART I METHODOLOGY 1. Set up questionnaires: The questionnaires were prepared with the support of, and reviewed by, UNIDO and ILO. Two meetings were organized with UNIDO/ ILO in order to detail the questionnaires for the pilot test. 2. Defining the sample list The sample list was established based on the following criteria: + Sample size requirements outlined in the TOR + Sampling methodology detailed in the TOR + Beneficiary list provided by CPMU. Based on the set criteria, a sample list of 275 producers and 30 SMEs was clearly identified, together with the specific locations of the five value chains as per the requirements set in the TOR. The control sample group of 53 producers (households) in crafts in the five value chains was also identified by the surveying groups with the assistance of local people. Sampling method: the interview team implemented the following sampling protocol to select and recruit producers and traders to be included in the baseline survey: 1. Consolidation of the survey population: to sort the provided list by PMU of project beneficiaries by value chain and province to arrive at sub-lists for each of the survey strata. 2. Determination of target response ratio: for each of the sample strata, the response ratio (R) is to be determined, by dividing the population size (S) by the target repose for the beneficiaries (Tb). R is rounded down to the nearest integer. 3. Compilation of the sample list: the population group list for each sample strata is alphabetically sorted, and from this list the sample is drawn by including the following numbers from the list, namely 1, R+1, 2R+1, 3R+1, 4R+1, 5R+1, etc until the target size has been reached (ie. if R=3, then producer/ trader 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, etc on the population list are included) 4. Correction for non-responses of project beneficiaries: in case a response can not reasonably be obtained from a producer or trader in the sample list, a substitute will be included being the next one on the list (ie. if producer with number 3R + 1 on list is included but unwilling or unable to respond, he is replaced with number 3R+2 of the respective list) 5. Addition of control group: identification of control responses is left to the surveyors. They can include any other households from the respective communes in the respective value chains, provided it does not occur on the respective survey population list. 3. Pilot test A pilot test was used to discover unforeseen difficulties in the two questionnaires (craft producers and SMEs) and if any existed, make the appropriate adjustments to the surveys. This pilot test was conducted in the months of June and August, 2010, in the five value chains in the provinces of Thanh Hoa, Hoa Binh, Phu Tho, Nghe An. A total number of 26 questionnaires were utilized (14 for producers and 12 for SMEs), as follows: Table 1.Place and number of surveying samples |Trades |Number of surveying sample | | |Nghe An | | |Nghe An |Thanh |Hoa Binh |Phu Tho|Total | | | |Hoa | | | | | | | |Male (%) | | | |Number | | | |Bam.& |Silk, |Sea-gra|Handmade |Lacquer|Average | | | |Rattan |brocade |ss |paper | | | |2 |Structure (%) |100% |100% |100% |100% |100% |100% | |2.1|Cultivation |11.6% |16.6% |10.0% |26.5% |39.4% |15.6% | |2.2|Livestock |19.8% |14.0% |14.1% |18.9% |9.9% |17.0% | |2.3|Fisheries |0.0% |0.0% |2.4% |0.0% |1.9% |0.5% | |2.4|Forestry |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% |3.2% |1.2% |0.2% | |2.5|Salt |3.0% |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% |1.7% | | |cultivation | | | | | | | |2.6|Service |2.6% |31.6% |5.8% |4.0% |1.6% |7.5% | |2.7|Surveyed craft |16.6% |21.1% |28.2% |2.0% |0.0% |16.6% | |2.8|Other |23.0% |10.0% |29.1% |0.0% |0.0% |18.6% | | |categories | | | | | | | |2.9|Other incomes |23.5% |11.2% |10.3% |45.5% |45.8% |22.9% | Other incomes (from temporary and other employment opportunities, wages, benefits, employee exports, etc.) accounts for the highest proportion (22.6%) within the structure of the household; and income from agriculture (cultivation and livestock) is the primary source of income for productive households, accounting for 32.6% of total income in the year. (*) Income from handmade paper: Only 2/16 surveyed household making handicraft, the list of other households are potential households to be expanded. 4. Employment structure in 2009 The data collected reveals that the surveyed craft attract most of labor, which accounts for 36.2% of total labors. Employment in fisheries, forestry, and salt cultivation is negligible. Table 6. Employment structure is classified based on the productive activities in 2009 |No.|Classificatio|Household group of all categories | | |n | | | | |Bam. |Silk, |Sea-gras|Handmade-|Lacquer |Average | | | |&Rattan|brocade |s |paper | | | |2 |Structure (%)|100% |100% |100% |100% |100% |100% | |2.1|Cultivation |19.1% |21.9% |15.6% |52.5% |55.8% |23.8% | |2.2|Livestock |5.0% |6.0% |5.2% |9.5% |6.8% |5.6% | |2.3|Fisheries |0.0% |0.0% |1.0% |0.0% |0.0% |0.2% | |2.4|Forestry |0.0% |0.9% |- |0.0% |0.0% |0.1% | |2.5|Salt |5.4% |0.0% |- |0.0% |0.0% |2.9% | | |cultivation | | | | | | | |2.6|Service |3.9% |18.0% |2.1% |0.0% |0.0% |4.9% | |2.7|Survey trade |42.2% |10.8% |64.6% |2.0% |0.0% |36.2% | | |(5 value | | | | | | | | |chains) | | | | | | | |2.8|Other |9.4% |11.7% |11.5% |0.0% |0.0% |8.8% | | |categories | | | | | | | |2.9|Other incomes|15.0% |10.8% |- |26.0% |17.6% |12.5% | [pic] The role of handicrafts for income and employment opportunities in the surveyed households reveals the proportion of labor cost are often twice the proportion of household income in all surveyed categories. It should be noted that the working day value of these categories is much lower than the overall correlation (1% in labor cost ~ 1% of total household income). 5a. Employment mechanism of household Table 7: Mechanism of household's employment |No. |Categories |Trading |Self-employ|Employed |Unemployed | | | |household |ed | | | |2 |Silk, brocade |3.0% |69.7% |27.3% |0.0% | |3 |Sea-grass |4.7% |88.4% |7.0% |0.0% | |4 |Handmade paper |0.0% |100.0% |0.0% |0.0% | |5 |Lacquer |0.0% |100.0% |0.0% |0.0% | | |Average |1.1% |47.7% |50.5% |0.7% | Of the surveyed households, 1.1% is business owners and 47.7% are self- employed. Over 50% of the households are employed (outsourcing) for enterprises / manufacturing companies and trading the above mentioned five commodity groups, of which households working in the bamboo & rattan commodity accounts for 77.9% of employment through outsourcing. 5b. Survey of employees working in the productive and trading establishment within the household A total of 134 business owners / self-employed households were surveyed and only ten engaged employers (up to 7.5%). The total number of employees they hired was 421 people; men accounting for 28.3%, and women accounting for 71.7%. Almost all of these workers are employed by verbal agreement and not entitled to any benefits or social welfare provisions. Table 8. Survey of employees working in the productive and trading establishment within the household |No|Categories |Form of |No. of house-holds hiring labor | |. | |employment | | | | | |Total | |1 |Bamboo & Rattan |5 |3.1% | |2 |Silk, brocade |0 |0 | |3 |Sea-grass |2 |4.7% | |4 |Handmade paper |0 |0 | |5 |Lacquer |0 |0 | | |Average |7 |2.5% | Only seven of the 275 households were registered businesses, and those were only on Bamboo & Rattan and Sea-grass production. In the survey we found a majority of household members are working for companies / enterprises, and the remainder are self-employed households and categorized as small producers or traders. 6. Bank account and savings The survey revealed few households have bank accounts, much less have a savings. Table 11.The banking and savings of surveyed households. |No. |Trade |Bank account |Savings in bank | | | |Account owner |Proport|Accoun|Proport-i|Average | | | | | |-ion |t |on (%) |amount/ | | | | | |(%) |owner | |savings | | | | | | | | |owner | | | | | | | | |(VND | | | | | | | | |million)| | | | |Commercial bank |30 |18.4 |14.1 |1.05 |18.8 | | | |Family member |12 |7.4 |10.3 |0.00 | - | | | |Social |5 |3.1 |8.1 |1.23 | 21.6 | | | |organizations | | | | | | | | |Broker |3 |1.8 |4.7 |2.50 |0.0 | | | |Cooperative |0 |0.0 |0.0 |0.00 |0.0 | | | |Others |3 |1.8 |20.0 |1.30 |18.0 | |2 |Silk, |Bank of social |19 |57.6 |10.4 |0.71 |37.9 | | |brocade |welfare | | | | | | | | |Commercial bank |8 |24.2 |36.6 |1.19 |5.7 | | | |Family member |0 |0.0 |- |- |0.0 | | | |Social |0 |0.0 |- |- |0.0 | | | |organizations | | | | | | | | |Broker |0 |0.0 |- |- |0.0 | | | |Cooperative |1 |3.0 |100.0 |1.60 |0.6 | | | |Others |0 |0.0 |- |- |0.0 | |3 |Sea-grass |Bank of social |24 |55.8 |25.2 |0.64 |31.2 | | | |welfare | | | | | | | | |Commercial bank |14 |32.6 |88.1 |1.25 |25.8 | | | |Family member |1 |2.3 |19.5 |- |- | | | |Social |9 |20.9 |15.9 |1.17 |29.869 | | | |organizations | | | | | | | | |Broker |1 |2.3 |2.0 |1.95 |- | | | |Cooperative |0 |- |- |- |- | | | |Others |1 |2.3 |3.5 |0.20 |4.2 | |4 |Handmade |Bank of social |4 |25.0 |5.8 |0.51 |30.8 | | |paper |welfare | | | | | | | | |Commercial bank |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 | | | |Family member |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 | | | |Social |1 |6.0% |0.2 |0.8 |6.4 | | | |organizations | | | | | | | | |Broker |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 | | | |Cooperative |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 | | | |Others |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 | |5 |Lacquer |Bank of social |12 |60.0% |5.1 |0.41 |22.8 | | | |welfare | | | | | | | | |Commercial bank |5 |25.0% |3.7 |0.34 |9 | | | |Family member |0 |0.0% |0 |0 |22.8 | | | |Social |0 |0.0% |0 |0 |0 | | | |organizations | | | | | | | | |Broker |0 |0.0% |0 |0 |0 | | | |Cooperative |0 |0.0% |0 |0 |0 | | | |Others |0 |0.0% |0 |0 |0 | Most households get loans from the Social Bank of Social Welfare because it offers low interest rates, ranging from 0.63 to 0.9% per month depending on the loan specifications and repayment plan. However, the maximum repayment plan is short-term and the amount poor households are allowed to borrow is quite low. Furthermore, households have to offset the lack amount by taking a higher interest loan from a commercial bank with more complicated loan conditions. Table 13. Financial supply sources of productive household |Financial supply sources |Total |Proportion |Total loans |Density | | |households | |(VND | | | |have a bank | |million) | | | |loan | | | | |1. Bank of social welfare|129 |57.8% |1,845.8 |42.7% | |2. Commercial bank |57 |25.6% |1,967.7 |45.5% | |3. Family member |13 |5.8% |143.1 |3.3% | |4. Social organizations |15 |6.7% |183.8 |4.3% | |5. Broker |4 |1.8% |16.1 |0.4% | |6. Cooperative |1 |0.4% |100 |2.3% | |7. Others |4 |1.8% |63.5 |1.5% | |Total |223 |100.0% |4,320 |100.0% | Financial supply sources for a productive household from commercial bank reached highest point of 45.5%, followed by the Social Welfare bank at 42.7%. Other sources such as family members, social organizations, broker, and cooperatives are negligible. Table 14. Loan purposes |No.|Categories |Purposes | | | |Personal| | |Bam.& |Silk, |Sea-gra|Handmade|Lacquer| | | |Rattan |brocade|ss |paper | | | |2. Value structure, be |100% |100% |100% |100% |100% |100% | |classified: | | | | | | | |2.1 Equipments, devices |1.7% |1.4% |2.2% |0.0% |0.8% |1.6% | |for handicraft | | | | | | | |production. | | | | | | | |2.2 Housing |69.2% |81.3% |68.6% |77.6% |81.4% |74.0% | |2.3 Other type of house |6.5% |0.8% |3.4% |0.0% |1.4% |3.6% | |2.4 Means of |18.0% |16.4% |22.8% |12.9% |12.1% |17.7% | |transportation | | | | | | | |2.5 Home appliances |4.6% |1.1% |3.0% |9.5% |4.2% |3.3% | Houses are mainly proportioned in total property value of the household. Value of equipment and facilities for handicraft production is negligible (1.6% of total property). Table 16. Land area per household Unit: m2 |Categ|Classification |Land area |Agricultural productive area | |ories| | | | | | | |Private ownership | | | | |Sufficient | | | | |Grid | | | |Total |Private water | | | | |sources | | | |Total | | | | | |Bam. & |Silk, |Sea-gra|Handmade|Lacquer|Averag| | |Rattan |brocade|ss |paper | |e | |Safety system |25.2% |36.4% |58.10% |56.30% |5.00% |32.0% | |Market/ food stalls |28.2% |24.2% |14.00% |100.00% |5.00% |28.0% | |Public transportation |0.0% |0.0% |41.90% |0.00% |70.00% |11.6% | |Primary school |0.0% |0.0% |9.30% |0.00% |10.00% |2.2% | |Middle school |0.0% |0.0% |9.30% |0.00% |10.00% |2.2% | |Doctor/ health service/ |21.5% |0.0% |32.60% |56.30% |30.00% |23.3% | |hospital | | | | | | | |Public telephone |0.0% |24.2% |4.60% |6.30% |5.00% |4.4% | |Public computer/ Internet|15.3% |24.2% |44.20% |62.50% |90.00% |29.1% | |Organization who |46.6% |30.3% |60.50% |12.50% |0.00% |41.4% | |providing loan/ finance | | | | | | | For difficult conditions, each group of households (according to surveyed categories) have specific characteristics: for bamboo & rattan group, it is difficult to access financial services; For the silk and brocade group, the most difficult is securing a safe source of drinking water, a disproportionate 57.6% of households. The 60.5% of those in the sea-grass group also report difficulty in accessing financial service. A challenge faced by the 100% of the handmade paper group is access to a marketplace and food products since the market is very far from their place. The lacquer group has no access to a public computer / Internet in 90% of households. In addition to the above difficulties, people also face other difficulties such as shortage of qualified nurses and doctors in their locality, or easy access to local hospitals. Other localities report lack of access to public transportation. D. HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION INDEX 16. Handicraft production Table 24. Household's Production |TT |Crafts Category |Total of |Household has | | | |surveyed |handicraft | | | |household | | | | | |Number of |Percentage | | | | |households | | |1 |Bamboo & Rattan |163 |153 |93.9% | |2 |Silk, brocade |33 |16 |48.5% | |3 |Sea grass |43 |41 |95.4% | |4 |Handmade paper |16 |2 |12.5% | |5 |Lacquer |20 |0 |0.0% | | |Total |275 |212 |77.1% | In the provided list of beneficiaries and specified crafts production, the list of surveyed households is taken through random selection. However, when surveyed, some households had changed or stopped production of crafts all together. In particular, households related to lacquer ware did not produce craft themselves but were growers of craft materials. 17. Information about production activity Table 25 The number and average turnover per household in the handicraft category |No |Category | | |Step 1 |step 2 |Step 3 | | | | |recycle | | | |common |easy | | |The |Percentage (%) | | |number of| | | |household| | | | |Briefly introduction about the process at | | | |work | | |Number of household|Percentage (%) |The work is safe,| | | | |no need | | | | |protective | | | | |equipments | | |Number |Percent|Number |Percenta|Number | | |of |age |of |ge |of | | |househo| |househol| |househo| | |ld | |d | |ld | |International or|0.0% |0.0% | |local Commercial| | | |Chamber | | | | |Household |Percentage |Household |Percentage % | | | |(%) | | | |Silk, Brocade |0 |0 |33 |100.0 | |Sea grass |0 |- |43 |100.0 | |Handmade paper |0 |0 |16 |100.0 | |Lacquer |0 |0 |20 |100.0 | Because households are producers with a small number of workers and small production, there is no other existing union or social organization for members to participate in. 30. Services have been used by households for 2 years In the last two years, 38.5% of households have participated in training and received technical services. 26.6% accessed the technical service which provides access to new designs. Under-utilized services include information services and access to new technologies. Table 38. The percentage of households use services |TT |Kinds of service |Bam. |Silk, |Sea |Handmade|Lacquer|Others | | | |&Ratta|Brocade |grass |paper | | | | | |n | | | | | | |2 |Fair / connection |1.8% |3.0% |0.0% |6.3% |0.0% |1.8% | | |with new provider | | | | | | | |3 |Access to new design|39.9% |18.2% |0.0% |12.5% |0.0% |26.6% | |4 |Train skills |46.5% |33.3% |16.3% |12.5% |50.0% |38.5% | |5 |Information about |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% |12.5% |0.0% |0.7% | | |chances and tendency| | | | | | | | |of market | | | | | | | |6 |Information and |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% |0.0% | | |accession to new | | | | | | | | |technology | | | | | | | |7 |Make new models |4.8% |3.0% |9.3% |0.0% |0.0% |4.7% | The survey revealed that a frequent change in new designs for products is the main cause leading to a low income per day. This is a pressing issue for not only producers but also businesses because it is difficult to find constant market for products. 31. The Problems Table 40. The percentage of surveyed households have some difficult |Problems |Bam. |Silk, Brocade |Sea grass |Handmade paper | | |Rattan | | | | | | | | |<5 years |5-10 years |10-20 years |>20 years | |Number of businesses |8 |5 |10 |3 | |Percentage of the total|30.8% |19.2% |38.5% |11.5% | |businesses surveyed | | | | | There are almost 1 / 3 of new businesses are under 5 years, the number of businesses with over 20 years experience are only 11.5%, most businesses have some operational experience ranging from 10 - 20 years. Bamboo/ rattan and lacquer are 2 categories where some businesses have operational experience over 10 years and accounted for higher.rate. Table 42: Type of production and business |Categori|Type of businesses | |es | | | |Business establishment registered | | |Total land area of |Classified based on (m2) | | |business (m2) | | | |Total |Land registry | | |Grid |Generator | | |Tap water |Wells | | |Drainage system |Having wastewater |No have | | | |treatment | | | |Private | | |Good |Medium |Difficult | |Number of businesses |12 |6 |8 | |Percentage |46.2% |23.1% |30.8% | There are 8 of 26 surveyed businesses (accounting for 30.8%) have difficulties in transportation, which are concentrated in silk, brocade producers (three producers), rattan (2 producers). Table 48: Raw materials |Categories |Raw materials in use | | |Firewood | | |Bam.& rattan|Sea-grass | | | |Full-time |Part-time |Family | |Lacquer |253 |84 |168 |1 | |Bam.& rattan |579 |101 |477 |2 | |Silk, brocade |98 |29 |69 |0 | |Sea-grass |164 |45 |117 |3 | |Handmade paper |15 |15 |0 |0 | |Average |323 |70 |251 |1 | Bamboo & rattan producers attract more labors, averaging employ nearly six hundred employees/SME, more than double compared to lacquer producer, four times higher than sea-grass and six times higher than silk, brocade SME. However, the percentage of part-time workers compared to the total number of employees working for bamboo/rattan higher than other value chains. The ratio between full-time employees and part-time employees for lacquer producer is 1.0: 2.0; bamboo & rattan is 1.0: 4.7; silk, brocade is: 1.0: 2.4; sea-grass is 1.0: 2.6; This ratio is partly reflecting a stable level of production of such businesses and generally lacquer producer is more stably in production while bamboo & rattan wares has highest ratio of part time employee. Table 51: The average number of employees of business surveyed |Employment form |Total |Contract form |Gender | | |number of| | | | |employees| | | | | |Hand-writing | | | |Number of employees entitled |Number of | | | |paid leave |employees | | | | |entitled | | | | |insurance | | | |Sick leave | | |Total |No |Having |Not cooperate | | | |difficul|difficulties|due to lack of| | | |ties | |respect | |Lacquer |Lacquer picture |piece |71,141 |3,661.9 | | |Lacquer ceramic |piece |33,517 |1,975.0 | | |Other |piece |83,333 |11,653.3 | | |Total | | |17,290.2 | |Bam.& rattan |Knitting, slanting |piece |438,200 |11,656.1 | | |items... | | | | | |Basket, furniture |piece |161,020 |11,740.3 | | |Other |kg |12,014,000 |195.6 | | |Total | | |23,591.9 | |Mulberry |Silk and byproduct |kg |1,573 |548.8 | | |Scalf, silk brocade |piece |6,305 |1,088.9 | | |Blanket, bed sheet |piece |6,600 |5,520.7 | | |pillows | | | | | |Total | | |7,158.4 | |Sea-grass |Bags, boxes |piece |5,561,000 |58,841.7 | | |Mattress |m2 |400,000 |6,580.3 | | |Other |kg |900,000 |9,063.0 | | |Total | | |74,485.0 | |Handmade |All types |sheets |16,000 |40.0 | |paper | | | | | The average turnover of a business reaches 24.2 bil VND in 2009, highest reported were in sea-grass SMEs which reached almost VND74.5 bil, bamboo/rattan reached VND23.6 bil, lacquer reached VND17.3 bil. Table 55: Some major inputs materials, on average for a business. |Value chain |Material |Unit |Quantity |Costs(million | | | | | |VND) | |Lacquer |Plywood |m2 |6,058 |241.5 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |Bamboo |kg |31,000 |432.7 | | |Inner frame |pc |16,497 |1,101.7 | | |Lacquer |kg |4,101 |1,335.3 | | |Other |kg |38 |94.2 | | | Total | | |3,205.4 | |Bam.& rattan |Unfinished |sp |9,000 |6,987.5 | | |products | | | | | | | | | | | |Rattan, bamboo | |326,717 |2,111.9 | | | Total | | |9,099.4 | |Silk, brocade|Cocoon |kg |6,000 |303.0 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |Silk, thread |kg |41,601,527 |1,231.4 | | |Other | |0 |2,000.0 | | |Fabric, silk |m |4,167 |933.3 | | | Total | | |4,467.7 | |Sea-grass |Sea-grass |kg |1,670,467 |11,666.7 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |Sea-grass's |kg |1,000,000 |2,700.0 | | |inner part | | | | | | Total | | |14,366.7 | |Handmade |Paper mulberry |kg |10,000 |0.0 | |paper |bark | | | | | |Other |kg |602 |2.7 | | | Total | | |2.7 | Inner frame and lacquer are two materials which accounted for the highest cost for lacquer SMEs. For bamboo & rattan, the cost for buying unfinished products is 3.5 times higher than the cost of buying materials of bamboo, rattan, ... That means, these SMEs mainly collect unfinished products from part-time workers and do the finishing and marketing steps. Table 56: Other input materials, on average for a business. |Input |Unit |Value chain | | | |Lacquer |Bam.& rattan |Silk, brocade |Sea-grass | | | |Q'ty | | | |Recycle | | | |Release to drain system | | | |Center/ local shop | | | |Common |Easy |Difficult | | |No. | | |Business without |Factor to improve quality | | |record | | | | | | |Yes |No |Not know | | |No. |% | | | |No of |Percent |The frequency of | | | |companie|% |accident per year | | | |s | | | | |No of companies |Percent % | | |No of |Percent % |No of |Percent % | | |companies | |companies | | |Lacquer |2 |33.3% |4 |66.7% | |Bam. & Rattan |5 |50.0% |5 |50.0% | |Silk, Brocade |3 |50.0% |3 |50.0% | |Sea grass |0 |0.0% |3 |100.0% | |Handmade paper|1 |100.0% |0 |0.0% | |Total |11 |42.3% |15 |57.7% | In average, there is 42.3% of companies don't have occupational safety policy. Among these, 100% of seagrass companies, 50% of silk companies and only 33.3% of lacquer companies has occupational safety policy. Table 64: Information and training on occupational safety for workers |Category |Information and training on occupational safety | | |Briefly |Have |Have information about | | |introduction |information |occupational safety | | |about the |sheet | | | |process at work| | | | |No of companies |Percent (%) | | |No of |Percent (%) |No of |Percent (%) | | |companies | |companies | | |Lacquer |3 |50.0% |3 |50.0% | |Bam. & Rattan |2 |20.0% |8 |80.0% | |Silk, Brocade |5 |83.3% |1 |16.7% | |Sea grass |2 |66.7% |1 |33.3% | |Handmade paper |1 |100.0% |0 |0.0% | |Total |13 |50.0% |13 |50.0% | 50% surveyed companies have emergency equipment, among them the highest percent belongs to bamboo/rattan, followed by lacquer SME Table 67: Companies have employees are trained about emergency |Category |The No of companies |The No of companies|The No of | | |do not have their |have their |companies don't | | |employees are |employees are |know their | | |trained about |trained about |employees are | | |emergency |emergency |trained about | | | | |emergency Không rõ| | |No of Companies |Percentage | | |No of Companies|Percentage % |No of |Percentage %| | | | |Companies | | |Lacquer |3 |50.0% |3 |50.0% | |Bam. & Rattan |5 |50.0% |5 |50.0% | |Silk, Brocade |4 |66.7% |2 |33.3% | |Sea grass |1 |33.3% |2 |66.7% | |Handmade paper |1 |100.0% |0 |0.0% | |Total |14 |53.8% |12 |46.2% | Except for lacquer and handmade paper SMEs, the other value chain all have 50% of total companies which have labor union. Table 70: Bank account |Category |Companies don't |Companies have bank account | | |have bank account | | | | |Yes but personal |Yes and business | | | |account of business|bank account | | | |owner | | | |No of |Percentage|No of |Percentage %| | |Companies |% |Companies | | |Commercial bank (1) |1,491.6 |96.9% |0.98% |11.8 | |Social welfare bank |13.5 |0.9% |0.20% |7.0 | |(2) | | | | | |Broker (3) |15.4 |1.0% |1.17% | - | |Relatives (4) |0.0 |0.0% | - | - | |Other (friend, ...) |19.2 |1.2% |0.00% | - | |(5) | | | | | |Total |1,539.7 |100.0% |0.96% | | Most of companies have loan demand for production and trade transaction. Among 26 surveyed companies, each has loan over 1.5 bil VND on average. Bamboo/rattan companies has the highest amount about 2.5 bil VND/company; and 1.7 bil VND/company among seagrass companies; and 740 mil VND/ company among silk companies. The most common source of loan is commercial bank (account for 96.9%) and average interest is 0.98%/month, average term is approximate 12 months. Other source account for little percent in loan source structure of surveyed companies. Table 72: Opinions about sources of loan |Category |Which source you |And why ? | | |satisfy most | | | |(1) | | |Purchas|Purch|Pay wage |Build/improv| | |e |ase | |e workshop | | |materia|equip| | | | |l |ment | | | | | | | | |The No of|Percentag|Not |Not | | |companies|e |available|neccessar| | | | | |y | |Entrepreneuship traning course |19 |73.1% |17 |2 | |Fair / connection with new |7 |26.9% |6 |1 | |provider | | | | | |Access to new design |17 |65.4% |16 |1 | |Train skills |11 |42.3% |10 |1 | |Information about chances and |11 |42.3% |10 |1 | |tendency of market | | | | | |Information and accession to |19 |73.1% |19 |0 | |new technology | | | | | In general, the number of companies don't use service make up largerer percentage than number of companies use. There are up to 73.1% of companies didn't use Entrepreneuship traning course; 65.4% of them didn't use Access to new design; 73.1% of companies didn't use Information and accession to new technology;... The main reason for not using service is that those services are not available. Table 76: The problems of the companies |Category | The main problems of companies | | |Lack of material provider | | |Capital|Renewal of equipment/ technology |Impro| | | | |ve | | | | |manag| | | | |ement| | | | |, | | | | |desig| | | | |n | | | | |capab| | | | |ility| |1 |Table 1|Place and number of surveying samples |5 | |2 |Table 2|Number of samples surveyed by the province and by |6 | | | |value chain | | |3 |Table 3|General data on interviewees. |8 | |4 |Table 4|General information on surveyed households |8 | |5 |Table 5|Income and income structure of households. |9 | |6 |Table 6|Employment structure based on the productive |10 | | | |activities in 2009 | | |7 |Table 7|Mechanism of household's employment |11 | |8 |Table 8|Survey of employees working in the productive and |11 | | | |trading establishment within the household | | |9 |Table 9|Difficulties encountered by women business owners.|12 | |10 |Table |Registered business households |12 | | |10 | | | |11 |Table |The banking and savings of surveyed households. |13 | | |11 | | | |12 |Table |Loan sources of surveyed households |14 | | |12 | | | |13 |Table |Financial supply sources of productive household |15 | | |13 | | | |14 |Table |Loan purposes |15 | | |14 | | | |15 |Table |Properties of household |16 | | |15 | | | |16 |Table |Land area per household |17 | | |16 | | | |17 |Table |Housing |18 | | |17 | | | |18 |Table |Food providing |18 | | |18 | | | |19 |Table |Household electricity |19 | | |19 | | | |20 |Table |Clean water for household |19 | | |20 | | | |21 |Table |Access to safe sanitation |20 | | |21 | | | |22 |Table |Energy sources for cooking |20 | | |22 | | | |23 |Table |Difficulty in accessing government infrastructure |21 | | |23 | | | |24 |Table |Household's Production |22 | | |24 | | | |25 |Table |Average turnover per household in the handicraft |22 | | |25 |category | | |26 |Table |The steps and used tools |23 | | |26 | | | |27 |Table |The waste treatment methods of household |24 | | |27 | | | |28 |Table |The situation of the product consumption |24 | | |28 | | | |29 |Table |Difficulties in selling products in other markets |25 | | |29 | | | |30 |Table |Quality standard from the consumer |26 | | |30 | | | |31 |Table |The application of environmental regulations |27 | | |31 | | | |32 |Table |Situation of occupational accidents in production |27 | | |32 |and business | | |33 |Table |.Information about training occupational safety |28 | | |33 |for workers | | |34 |Table |The provision of labor protective equipments |28 | | |34 | | | |35 |Table |Emergency equipments in producing and business |29 | | |35 |household | | |36 |Table |The percentage of households joins in |29 | | |36 |organizations | | |37 |Table |Households have labor union or other unions |30 | | |37 | | | |38 |Table |The percentage of households use services |30 | | |38 | | | |39 |Table |Demand on one field in producing |31 | | |39 | | | |40 |Table |Information about the interviewees |33 | | |40 | | | |41 |Table |Production and business experiences |33 | | |41 | | | |42 |Table |Type of production and business |34 | | |42 | | | |43 |Table |Land use of business |34 | | |43 | | | |44 |Table |Electricity use of business |34 | | |44 | | | |45 |Table |Water use of business |35 | | |45 | | | |46 |Table |Drainage system and wastewater treatment |35 | | |46 | | | |47 |Table | Transportation |36 | | |47 | | | |48 |Table |Raw materials |36 | | |48 | | | |49 |Table |Handicraft production |36 | | |49 | | | |50 |Table |The average number of employees in value chain |37 | | |50 | | | |51 |Table |The average number of employees of business |37 | | |51 |surveyed | | |52 |Table |Employee's benefits |38 | | |52 | | | |53 |Table |Difficulties which woman experienced in the role |39 | | |53 |of business's leader. | | |54 |Table |Major products and average turnover of a business |39 | | |54 |in 2009 | | |55 |Table |Some major inputs materials, on average for a |40 | | |55 |business. | | |56 |Table |Other input materials, on average for a business. |41 | | |56 | | | |57 |Table |Solid waste treatments |42 | | |57 | | | |58 |Table |Wastewater treatment methods | | | |58 | | | |59 |Table |Product consuming market |43 | | |59 | | | |60 |Table |Standard quality from customer |44 | | |60 | | | |61 |Table |Applying environmental regulations |45 | | |61 | | | |62 |Table |Occupational accidents in production and business |45 | | |62 | | | |63 |Table |Occupational safety policy |46 | | |63 | | | |64 |Table |Information and training on occupational safety |46 | | |64 |for workers | | |65 |Table |The provision of protective equipments for workers|47 | | |65 | | | |66 |Table |Emergency equipments and enterprises |47 | | |66 | | | |67 |Table |Companies have employees are trained about |48 | | |67 |emergency | | |68 |Table |Organizations which household join in |48 | | |68 | | | |69 |Table |Companies have labor union |49 | | |69 | | | |70 |Table |Bank account |49 | | |70 | | | |71 |Table |The average amount of loan per surveyed companies |50 | | |71 | | | |72 |Table |Opinions about sources of loan |50 | | |72 | | | |73 |Table |Purposes of loan |51 | | |73 | | | |74 |Table |The No of companies use services and satisfaction |51 | | |74 |level | | |75 |Table |The No of companies don't use services |52 | | |75 | | | |76 |Table |The problems of the companies |52 | | |76 | | | |77 |Table |Companies' demand |53 | | |77 | | | ----------------------- Average turnoverr per company (Mil VND) paper[pic][?]$@qs¯±²t u w ® ° ± ² Ç Ý Þ à :@AðçÞÕÌÀ·À¬À¬À¬À À.?}.}q}e}q}Y}q}hIi"h- 5?CJaJhIi"h$rÀ5?CJaJhIi"häJð5?CJaJhIi"hâvE5?CJaJhIi"hä$?5?CJaJhIi"hâvECJaJhI i"h?È5?CJaJhIi"h

Name of InstitutionGreen Production and Trade

Added/Updated byGiulia Macola



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